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Justine Schneider

Justine Schneider

Justine Schneider
Professor of Mental Health & Social Care
Faculty of Social Sciences

Justine has extensive experience in many aspects of applied health research using a wide range of methodologies and approaches. She has particular expertise in mental health service evaluation, carers, care homes, costs and supported employment. Her current work focuses primarily on dementia and staff development, and she is exploring innovative approaches to knowledge exchange in dementia care.

Justine Schneider

“How can we take the pressure off health and social care?”  This was the question posed to a panel of professionals by the Lunar 21 discussion group on April 3rd, 2017.

Justine Schneider

I met Chris and Jayne at a meeting of researchers in Maastricht recently. They were representing the European Association of People with Dementia, of which Chris is vice-chair. Along with a Norwegian couple, they were advising the network on involving people with d

Justine Schneider

Our expectations of old age are increasingly overshadowed by the probability of progressive memory loss. The issues thrown up by this phenomenon have implications for scholars in the Arts and Humanities, as well as in the Social Sciences and Medicine.

Justine Schneider

There is something apposite about a university – which runs on brain power – becoming dementia-friendly. It recognises that human beings have value beyond their intellectual capacity.  How can an institution whose purpose lies in developing intellectual potential also be dementia-friendly?

Justine Schneider

In generating public understanding about dementia, the arts and social sciences have as much to offer as neuroscience.  This is the starting-point of a group which has been invited to take up the 2016-2018 residency in The Hub at Wellcome Collection, a flagship space and resource for interdiscipl

Justine Schneider

I am on a suburban London train and eavesdropping on a conversation behind me in an almost-empty carriage. The two ladies are in their sixties, I'd guess, discussing their families.

Justine Schneider

There is no way of knowing within a reasonable margin of error whether a person without symptoms will develop dementia of any kind. Yet I think if there were a reliable diagnostic tool I would want to know my risk, simply so that I could adjust my planning for my latter years.

Justine Schneider

I've spent the past weekend at a conference on music therapy and dementia at Anglia Ruskin Univeristy, Cambridge. Astonishingly, it was a world first for a conference topic that seems to be of wide interest. 

Justine Schneider

The Mary Chester club is a day centre in Perth run by the Alzheimer’s Society of Western Australia.  They opened their doors today to hundreds of delegates to the Alzheimer Disease International conference.