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Tom Dening

Tom Dening

Tom Dening
Professor of Dementia Research
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Tom is the head of the Centre for Dementia in the Institute of Mental Health at Nottingham. With over 20 years experience as a Consultant in Old Age Psychiatry, he is currently an Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist with Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust. Tom has extensive NHS management and leadership experience.

Tom Dening

Learn all about the binturong.

Tom Dening

A spell of cold winter weather ends as the winds swing round from the east or the Arctic and come from the Atlantic, billowing in from the south west. To step outside on such a morning is heaven; the air is fresh, moist and balmy. The birds respond and sing their little hearts out.

Tom Dening

Peter Ashley died on 10th November 2015. This brings to an end a remarkable life and he is much missed by the people who knew him. He made a great contribution to how dementia is perceived, spoken about and responded to.

Tom Dening

TAnDem is short for The Arts aNd DEMentia. It is the joint Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) hosted by the Centre for Dementia, University of Nottingham, and the Association for Dementia Studies, University of Worcester.

Tom Dening

Hearing loss is common as we get older. Age is the main risk factor for dementia. The two conditions may occur together, but can deafness cause dementia?

Tom Dening

I am relatively new in the world of academia but it is obvious that research and especially the money to pay for it is a big preoccupation in this sector. A great deal of time and energy is spent thinking and talking about research plans and possible grant opportunities.

Tom Dening

I’ve always loved books. My mother would borrow a fresh batch from the town library each Thursday and we would devour them. Books have always been great presents as even the ones you wouldn’t have picked out to buy for yourself often turn out to be an interesting read.

Tom Dening

Apathy is a curious thing. It has various definitions, most of which have two components – one to do with lack of interest, concern, enthusiasm, and the other to do with lack of emotion.

Tom Dening

Developing dementia is dreaded more than any other medical condition, at least by people of middle age and upwards. It’s often said in conversation that we would rather be dead than live like that.

Tom Dening

This isn’t about dementia at all but it’s about what dominated the weekend for this researcher.

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