Home | Blogs | Do What You Can While You Can

Do What You Can While You Can

idea.nottingham.ac.uk image: Dementia Day to Day blogs banner

Topics: 
approaches to dementia care, dementia awareness, dementia tips

The title of today's blog is not just a rallying cry to encourage fellow Dementers and their Carers to have as positive an approach to each day as possible. It is also, a statement that many may agree with and see as being obvious. However, where I am coming from in relation to this matter is that, when one can not operate in the way one was able a few years ago, it is easy and in many cases understandable, for the individual concerned to give up, not only on things that they can no longer undertake, but also on aspects of life that they are both physically and mentally capable of doing. It is therefore, I believe, important, in the first instance, that the Dementer and their Carer make every effort to ensure that they both undertake as many tasks, both physical and mental, as possible.

There may be positive aspects and pleasant surprises, for all concerned, if the positive "Do what you can, while you can" approach is adopted. This positive attitude and outlook should also underpin the approach and attitude of any health professional dealing with and being responsible for people with Dementia. They, like us, should be examining the opportunities that Dementia may provide, however brief, for people with the disease to continue to develop their potential, within the confines / limitations the condition presents. This is not to deny the, current, unstoppable advancement of the disease, but rather, to maximise the potential "good life" for both the Dementee and their Carer.  This "Good Life with Dementia" should be given the opportunity to flourish for as long as it can, to the benefit of all concerned.

Your comments

You'd be very welcome to leave a comment on this blog post.  You do need to be logged in to leave a comment, if you don't already have a username and password you can register here.

Your comment won't appear straight away as we'll need to check it first: thank you for your patience.

When leaving comments please bear in mind our posting rules.

See more like this

Kate Swaffer

In the 1970’s when I commenced my nursing, most people with dementia were diagnosed nearer to the end stage of the disease process, and little was known about dementia.

Sky Blue Lad

At this point in time I am recording events to give the reader an idea of life with dementia the elephant in the room.  Mixed dementia following stroke is a double whammy as you are never sure what is the cause of presentation.

Emily Cousins

Last year I successfully applied for an INTERDEM Academy fellowship in order to undertake a case study on music therapy as part of my PhD research. My project hopes to define and describe arts interventions for people with dementia.