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May I introduce my husband?

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I would describe my husband as kind, gentle, caring, appreciative, loyal, friendly, generous, tolerant, forgiving, uncomplaining, courageous, stoical, helpful, polite, well mannered... to sum up, to know him is to love him, and he is so often referred to by others as a 'lovely man', and by an Irish priest we know as a 'darling man'.

You might well say “a bit of a paragon then?”

Well, I am a tad biased of course, but I would say yes, he is. It is certainly difficult to find any fault in him, except that he wriggles.

During his long stay in hospital, before being released into my care, it never ceased to amaze the nursing staff that, despite his very limited mobility (he is hemplegic) he could be re-positioned in bed, and yet minutes later would have slid down so that his 6ft2inch frame was concertina'd at the foot of the bed. Called on numerous times a day to be repositioned, it is little wonder that he quickly became known throughout the ward as 'The Wriggler'.

At home, I try raising the foot of the bed, to defy gravity, but it doesn't work. So, little has changed, except that using a slide sheet single handed takes a bit of ingenuity, to say the least, and that I have corrupted the Wriggler title into Wriggle Bum. This is how I will refer to him, but in writing it will often get abbreviated to WB.

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